Palazzo Farnese, sede dell´Ambasciata di Francia - Monuments - Visite guidate a Roma
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Palazzo Farnese, sede dell´Ambasciata di Francia

Palazzo Farnese


Piazza Farnese, 67 - 00100


P R I C E S

Cost of the visit: 9 euros (admission + guide) + 3 euros (booking fees)
Friday at 17.00 visit in Italian extended to the EFR library: 11 euros (admission + guide) + 3 euros (booking fees)
COOPERATIVE DREAM

Viale Regina Margherita, 192 - 00198 ROME
Tel. 06 / 85.30.17.58 Fax 06 / 85.30.17.56
Email: service@romeguide.it

ADVANCE PAYMENT
 
AT THE TIME OF BOOKING, YOU WILL NEED TO LEAVE THE NAME, NAME, DATE AND PLACE OF BIRTH AND NUMBER OF AN IDENTIFICATION DOCUMENT.
BOOKING CONFIRMATION IS SUBJECT TO THE AVAILABILITY OF THE PALAZZO FARNESE ONLINE BOOKING SYSTEMS.
MANDATORY BOOKING FOR TWO WEEKS BEFORE

For reservations:
BOOK ONLINE
(IT IS COMPULSORY TO SPECIFY NAME, SURNAME, DATE AND PLACE OF BIRTH OF EACH OF THE PARTICIPANTS AND NUMBER OF AN IDENTIFICATION DOCUMENT)

T I M E T A B L E S

- Monday at 5.00pm - Wednesday at 15.00, 16.00
- Friday at 17.00

AVAILABILITY REQUEST


Extraordinary opportunity to visit Palazzo Farnese, today home of the Embassy of France.

The palace, called "the nut" is considered by many to be the most impressive and beautiful in Rome. During the visit we will admire the access hall of Sangallo, the cornice created by Michelangelo and the famous Gallery which was frescoed between 1597 and 1604 by Annibale Carracci.
We will also admire the great Hall which features a rich coffered ceiling, numerous tapestries reproducing the Raphaelesque frescoes of the Vatican Rooms and, on either side of the fireplace, the reclining statues of the Abundance and Peace of Guglielmo Della Porta. The adjacent Sala dei Fasti Farnesiani was decorated with frescoes by Francesco Salviati and the Zuccari.

ATTENTION! Palazzo Farnese is the diplomatic seat of the French Embassy in Rome, so the visits can only be made according to the following modalities:
- Registration is closed one week before the visit date and no registration is taken into consideration after this deadline.
- The route can be changed due to service requirements.
- In case of cancellation by the Embassy, ??it will be proposed either the postponement of the visit or the reimbursement.
- Children under the age of 10 are not allowed.
- The interpretation in other languages ??during the visit is not authorized
The original project of the palace is due to Antonio da Sangallo the Younger, on behalf of Cardinal Alessandro Farnese (future Pope Paul III), who between 1495 and 1512 had purchased the Ferriz palace and other buildings that stood in the area . The works, begun in 1514, were interrupted by the sack of Rome in 1527 and were resumed in 1541, after the rise to the papacy of Cardinal Farnese, with modifications to the original project and to the work of Sangallo himself. In particular, the square in front of it was created.
After the Sangallo's death in 1546, the works were continued under Michelangelo's direction: the cornice above the facade, the balcony above the central portal with the great coat of arms and the completion of a large part of the internal courtyard seems to him. The Pope's death interrupted the work again in 1549.
Other works were carried out by Ruggero, nephew of the Pope, between 1565 and his death in 1575, directed by Vignola. Finally to Giacomo della Porta, called by the second cardinal Alessandro Farnese, another nephew of the pope, we owe the rear part with the façade towards the Tiber, completed in 1589 and which should have been connected to a bridge, never built, to the Villa Chigi ( or "Farnesina"), purchased in 1580 on the opposite bank.

Because of its size and shape, the palace was called "the Farnese die" and was considered one of the "Four Wonders of Rome", along with the Cembalo dei Borghese, the Scala dei Caetani and the Portone dei Carboniani. br>
The building overlooks a square decorated with fountains, which re-use granite basins from the Baths of Caracalla. The façade, made of bricks with a travertine base (56 m on each side), is on three floors. The 13 windows of each floor have different decorations, and those on the main floor are crowned with alternating curvilinear and triangular pediments.
The restoration carried out in 2000 showed a decoration obtained with the use of albase bricks (slightly fired, yellow and particularly porous) and ferraioli (very fired, red and very resistant) in some parts of the façade and , in some cases, even with dull color. However, these decorations follow different logics on the right and on the left side of the façade. The latter presents a geometrically defined decoration with lozenges, also in the tympanums of the windows of the piano nobile there are floral inlays, always made with two-tone bricks. These two-tone bricks are also used for the windowing of the windows, which has a characteristic notched apparatus, presumably for structural reasons. These decorations have let us suppose over the years that the beautifully decorated curtain wall, cut and rolled up, was made to be left exposed.
The right side of the façade is much less cared for, the well-defined lozenges are few and most of the iron rings are placed in bulk in the upper part of the main floor, near the cantonal. This discrepancy on the facade of what is presumably the most important noble palace of Renaissance Rome has instead supported the hypothesis that the curtain should be covered and that the perfectly smooth and almost monolithic equipment had the purpose of minimizing the thickness of the plaster in plaster of travertine, reducing it to two or three coats of lime milk. This hypothesis is supported by the discovery of traces of wisps on other important architectures of the period, such as the Palazzo dei Conservatori di Michelangelo in the Campidoglio complex.

You go inside through a vestibule with three naves covered by a barrel vault and separated by columns of Doric order in red granite.

The interior decoration is particularly refined. The "Camera del Cardinale" had already been frescoed in 1547 by Daniele da Volterra (upper frieze), while the "Sala dei Fasti Farnesiani" was painted by Francesco Salviati between 1552 and 1556 and completed by Taddeo Zuccari starting from 1563. To Annibale Carracci we owe the frescoes in the "Camerino", made in 1595 and in the "Gallery" (20 m long and 6 m wide), with stuccos and mythological paintings made together with his brother Agostino, between 1597 and 1605: in the middle of the vault stands the triumph of Bacchus and Ariadne.

In the room of Ercole was preserved the statue of the Ercole Farnese, currently at the National Archaeological Museum of Naples along with numerous other sculptures from the Farnese collection. There were also preserved the statues of Pietà and Abundance, by Giacomo della Porta and initially destined to the tomb of Paolo III.